HSU Unconference: How I Learned Shareout Building a Better Search by Going into Categories and Searching by Subject

From the Humboldt State University Library: “Nikki Martensen explains how to build a better search by going in to Categories and then searching by subject. By searching by subject, you’ll be exposed to related words that will enrich your search.”

Delivering HSU History to the Silicon Valley

This is a press-release detailing some archival adventures that happened over spring break with the Humboldt State University Library Scholar Program.

Published in spring 2016

Creating a Gift for the Future: Digitization Using Omeka.net

“Creating a Gift for the Future: Digitization Using Omeka.net”, April 22, 2016

Contributors: Alexandria Jones, Blanca Drapeau, Cathlyn Garibay, KayCie Voigt, Nicole Martensen, Victoria Bruner, Xi K. Bromley

A Collaborative poster describing online exhibit creation. Presented at the Humboldt State University 2016 Ideafest symposium.

“The Library Scholar Internship team is digitizing historically significant objects from the library’s Special Collections. This process involves more than scanning objects, but publishing to a broader research community using Omeka.net to create digital exhibits. In this poster we discuss our process creating metadata, scanning procedures, researching the collections and publicizing our work. Our goal is to encourage students and faculty to use the library’s resources such as Collaboration Stations, SkillShops, librarians, computer labs, #mondopad and peers to improve and publish their research. The library is a dynamic space for students to work on innovative and collaborative projects.”


Welcome to the Digital Age: Journey through Humboldt Room Archival Process

A display showcasing the digitization of archival materials. Located in the Humboldt State University Library using select materials from Humboldt Room Special Collections. Spring 2016 Semester.


The Sound of Silence: Suggesting an Evolutionary Perspective in Archaeoacoustics

Presenting at the 2014 Anthropology Research Symposium, Humboldt State University

Abstract

Humans have a common practice of altering auditory perception, with the ability to extend their sound experience through creating instruments, building acoustic amphitheater spaces, and producing rhythm and music with the body as with clapping, chanting, and singing. The field of archaeoacoustics offers insight into the use of sound in ancient societies. Previous research in this field has fixated on the auditory properties surrounding architectural spaces, for example, echo and amplification. These properties are often studied in relation to sound-producing artifacts. Archaeoacoustic scholars consider altering sound experience a product of human intention–as a deliberate investment of meaning rather than an epiphenomenal environmental coincidence. This has left a void of literature for the auditory architecture of religious, political and social spaces. This research will describe the issues and implications surrounding the interpretation of acoustic data in archaeology, focusing on the relation to spiritual and symbolic social practices. Theoretical perspectives will be drawn from previous archaeoacoustic research, as well as human evolutionary biology, as the evolution of auditory perception is likely to correlate with the development of art, language, and other symbolic social systems. This combination of ideas proposes a deeper understanding of the role of sound that has been essential to the human experience.